The Tudors: Margaret Tudor [ESFP]

Functional Order: Se-Fi-Te-Ni

Perceiving Functional Axis:

Extroverted Sensing (Se) / Introverted Intuition (Ni)

Margaret knows how to make things happen, and she also tends to live in the moment – her decision to sleep with Charles Brandon on the boat to Portugal, than to murder her “old man” husband so that she can leave with him soon, then to marry Brandon before they reach London, are all decisions made in the heat of the moment. But she also knows what she wants and how to get it, even if it involves risks. She is very physical and sexual, earthy and volatile, often losing her temper with her husband. Her lower Ni gives her an idea of what she wants from her future (her own choice in how she lives her life) but not much else, although she does offer a probing insight into her husband’s infidelity, which shows how well she knows his soul.

Judging Functional Axis:

Introverted Feeling (Fi) / Extroverted Thinking (Te)

She can be headstrong and opinionated, aware of what she wants from life and determined to get it; Margaret does not compromise when she feels she is right, flat out refusing to attend court while “that slut” (Anne Boleyn) takes Katharine of Aragon’s place. She believes Henry is a fool for his choices, but keeps her feelings about Brandon’s infidelities mostly to herself. She does not even tell him she’s dying of consumption. She often acts to get what she wants, and can be sharp-tongued when crossed.

Enneagram: 2w1 sexual

Margaret is searching for love, and she finds it with Charles Brandon – or so she thinks. It’s the bickering sort of love, but they make it work, until his infidelity breaks her heart. She is opinionated and forceful, she tries bartering and seduction when she can, but if that fails, she demands what she wants from the men around her, considering it “owed” (she married an old, decrepit king, she’s owed a young, handsome husband). Her 1 wing brings a sense of principles and a black and white view of her brother (and her husband’s) behaviors; she looks down on them for their public adultery and for shaming themselves with other women, especially Anne Boleyn.