Harry Potter: Remus Lupin [INFJ]

Functional Order: Ni-Fe-Ti-Se

Perceiving Functional Axis:

Introverted Intuition (Ni) / Extroverted Sensing (Se)

Lupin is the perfect teacher, able to come up with imaginative but useful ways for his students to learn the material. He makes D.A.D.A fun and useful, since he knows the students need to remember the material to make themselves safe in the future. He focuses on the larger picture at all times, which can be both an asset (in his ability to stay focused, and help Harry keep a clear head) and a liability (when he allows fear and guilt to take over his life and he runs away from Tonks and his baby). His intuitiveness gives him an edge when it comes to problem-solving and discerning who is trustworthy; he quickly realizes the truth about Sirius, with only one piece of evidence (how can a dead man be walking around Hogwarts?), and is an astute judge of Harry’s character, often insightful in how he chooses to let him (or not let him) combat threats. Lupin is harsh with Harry about certain aspects of his behavior, since he can foresee the negative consequences of his recklessness. His inferior Se causes him to be occasionally impulsive and reckless – Harry says he runs around, trying to block Tonks during the battle. Being around his friends stimulated Lupin and helped him feel alive and happy – he could be reckless when with the Marauders. He is observant of his students and mindful of changes in their behavior. His practicality keeps him grounded, but his tendency to live in the moment during dark times means he wallows in misery and makes impetuous decisions – like running away from his loved ones out of fear and self-loathing.

Judging Functional Axis:

Extroverted Feeling (Fe) / Introverted Thinking (Ti)

He was so eager to be liked by his friends that Lupin stood back and allowed them to torment Snape. His utter devotion to Dumbledore makes him trust him implicitly, even going so far as to be kind to Snape and give him the benefit of the doubt when all evidence indicates he isn’t to be trusted. Lupin likes to see the best in people and give them a chance to defend themselves. He abandons his position at school out of concern for his students and their parents’ opinions. He is so fearful that he might endanger his child, or fail to be a good father, that he abandons his duties and it takes Harry reminding him of that to bring him back again. His ability to think outside the box makes him a good teacher and clever in his ideas. Lupin is good at problem-solving and seeing the inconsistencies both in his own behavior and that of others. He’s curious about the world, a natural bookworm, but also rational in his advice (being angry with Harry for risking his life and the lives of his friends).

Enneagram: 9w1 social

Lupin has a good-natured disposition and an uncanny ability to see the best in everyone around him. When Harry warns him about Snape, Lupin tells him not to be so critical and reassures him that Snape has spent a long time doing nice things for him, even though he dislikes Lupin on a personal level (making his potions to keep him safe at the full moon). Though Snape goes behind his back numerous times and tries to expose him to the students and their parents, Lupin is never angry at him. He treats everyone in his class the same — with kindness and compassion, and is especially influential on Neville, since he knows how to soothe him into self-trust. Lupin admits that the greatest shame in his life is that he did not make Sirius and James stop bullying Snape in school, because he feared separation from them (that his asserting himself would make them abandon him). He’s also ashamed that he did not tell Dumbledore about their ability to shape-shift into animals for the same reason, because it was a betrayal of his trust. Lupin has a strong sense of right and wrong, and often chastises Harry for being foolish, reckless, and inconsiderate of others. His crippling sense of self-hatred causes him to devalue himself, accept whatever the world gives him, and even run away from his responsibilities — falling into disintegration to 6 under stress (fearing he’s more a danger and a source of shame to Tonks and the baby than he is an asset), but ultimately Harry berating him makes him so angry at Harry and at himself that he does the right thing and goes back to his family.