Dial M for Murder: Margot Wendice [ISTJ]

Functional Order: Si-Fe-Ti-Ne

Perceiving Functional Axis:

Introverted Sensing (Si) / Extroverted Intuition (Ne)

Though Margot has fallen in love with another man, in his long absence from England, she has become more reluctant to tell her husband and go away with him. This is partly because of an anticipated disruption to her routine, and also because her husband is being more “attentive.” Tony appears to be really trying to hold their marriage together. This confuses her, because she is comparing his behavior to what it was before, but it is not enough to arouse her suspicions he is up to something. She maintains a similar routine and is predictable enough that Tony knows how to set up the “perfect murder.” It only fails because she was able to grab the sewing scissors on the desk – an abnormality due to cutting up scrapbook photos earlier in the evening. Her Ne is very poor. She never suspects her husband set her up to get killed, and has no idea what is happening when he is framing her for murder, leaving it all up to her lawyers to defend her.

Judging Functional Axis:

Extroverted Thinking (Te) / Introverted Feeling (Fi)

Margot takes a rational approach to dealing with her blackmailer, by taking money out of the bank and trying to pay him off. She repeats exactly what happened to the police, in as much as she can remember the details, and seems quite detached and unemotional while doing it. When her key does not fit in the lock, after the police release her temporarily to return home for a few of her things, she tries no other way to get into the apartment; she simply goes to, and complains to, a cop on the corner. Margot keeps most of her feelings inside. She is not emotionally demonstrative to her lover, and is reluctant to approach her husband about the affair until she is ready.

Enneagram: 9w1 self-preservation

She is compliant and mild-mannered, and shows almost no extreme emotions, even when she’s on death row. She dislikes conflict so much, she backs down quickly when her husband argues with her about them “going out.” She does not want to tell him about the affair, and feels only able to do it with her lover at her side (but they never get the chance). Margot is somewhat “asleep” to her emotional needs and anger – she becomes upset at being interrogated, but relies too much on her husband to field off questions for her. She is slow to think badly of him, showing her idealistic tendencies. Her 1 wing feels a need to be sincere; she is not entirely comfortable living a lie.