Functional Order: Te-Si-Ne-Fi

Judging Functional Axis:

Extroverted Thinking (Te) / Introverted Feeling (Fi)

Shang is a competent leader whose father promotes him to an important position of training the troops because he respects his logical thinking and organizational skills. He frankly informs his “men” that he is going to turn them into proper soldiers, and expects them to fall in line. He has little tolerance for nonsense, games, or insubordination. He hands out punishments intended to push them into line (making them stay up half the night, retrieving every grain of rice out of the grass). Over time, Shang shows his feeling side – his respect for “Ping” once she proves she can do it, and his fondness for her, his trust in her, and eventually, in his desire to defy Chinese law and save her life. He coaches it as “a life for a life,” showing his intense honor code. He also works hard to earn the respect and admiration of his father, and intends to avenge him by defeating the Huns.

Perceiving Functional Axis:

Introverted Sensing (Si) / Extroverted Intuition (Ne)

His father trusts him to lead, because he says Shang has “studied” more than anyone he knows. Shang is an expert at what he does, because he has practiced and honed his skills to perfection. He expects the same from his army and trains them in a vigorous daily routine that includes martial arts classes, teaching them to fire arrows with precision and handle cannons, and strength training. His Ne is good, in that he sees another way to approach the law when confronted with discovering the truth about Mulan, but he also ignores her advice about looking out for the Huns in the city, believing them all dead in the avalanche. He does not notice, either, that she is a woman despite the obvious physical difference between her abilities and those of his men.

Enneagram: 1w2

Shang is proud and confident. He faces no doubts he can lead his men competently and is determined to prove himself to his father and the emperor. He is professional, dedicated, and hardworking, almost to a fault. Where his men have fun, he is busy thinking of what comes next and figuring out how to improve his ragtag bunch of warriors. Mulan humiliates him several times, but he does not let the others see it, and conducts himself appropriately. He prides himself on his honor and allows it to guide his decisions, even when it means somewhat turning his back on Mulan, to preserve the integrity of their valued traditional law. He believes in justice and duty, such as when he saves her life and claims he has now honored his life debt. Shang’s 2 wing shows in his kindness – though he is hard as he trains them, he also cuts her a break on a few occasions. He wants to serve his country in whatever way he can.