Functional Order: Ti-Ne-Si-Fe

Judging Functional Axis:

Introverted Thinking (Ti) / Extroverted Feeling (Fe)

Yoda is mostly interested in a complete understanding of the Force. His tendency to deviate from the topic, and abstract into philosophical thinking (Ti combined with Ne) makes it difficult for the sensor characters, such as Luke, to learn easily from him. He prefers objective analysis, and rejects Anakin for no reason other than he senses a darkness in the boy. He teaches in riddles, asking his students to think rather than giving them the answer. Yoda can be eccentric in a low Fe way, teasing and getting a kick out of frustrating Luke, even decades after his death. He is gentle in his criticisms at times, tolerant of others’ differences, and honest in his assessments. He also serves a “greater purpose” as a Jedi Master.

Perceiving Functional Axis:

Extroverted Intuition (Ne) / Introverted Sensing (Si)

He is vague, abstracting, and unspecific, asking Luke to ponder ideas rather than giving him straightforward instructions. He senses “much” in Anakin, both for good and evil, but leans strongly in neither direction. He sees The Force as a universal, complex system that involves many different ideas, potentials, and possibilities. In The Last Jedi, Yoda destroys the sacred Jedi tree, because he understands what Luke does not, that knowledge does not exist in tangible form (the books) but as a philosophy Rey will pass on to the next generation. He relies on his shared experience with others to form expectations of their behavior. As he grows old, Yoda withdraws from society, becomes more withdrawn, and spends much of his time in a state of sameness.

Enneagram: 5w4 self-preservation

Yoda devotes almost all his time and focus to contemplation. He is much more interested in the journey of teaching than its conclusion, which makes his lessons for Luke frustrating, since Luke wants to reach the end of them, and a firm conclusion, whereas Yoda simply wants to think about the complexities of the Force and their impact on the universe. Detached and rational, Yoda does not allow his personal feelings toward anyone to cloud his judgment. He imposes no “martial law” on anyone, even when Qui-Gon defies the Council and takes on Anakin as an apprentice. Yoda, as he grows older, increasingly withdraws from the sensory world and winds up an eccentric old hermit, delighted with being incomprehensible. His 4 wing broods on things intensely, and takes some pride in being unique.