Functional Order: Si-Te-Fi-Ne

Perceiving Functional Axis:

Introverted Sensing (Si) / Extroverted Intuition (Ne)

The past is never dead for Athos: it drives all his decisions, haunts his dreams, influences his perception of the world around him, and reinforces his beliefs. Athos finds it painful to go back to his lands and properties, and renounces his title in an attempt to divorce himself from happier times that ended on a sad note. He finds himself reliving those moments, when he returns – and whenever he sees his wife. Athos lives according to a traditional honor code, and in most instances, is willing to act the role of a musketeer and do “his duty.” Athos doesn’t show much interest in new possibilities, though he does abandon his old life completely to become a musketeer, renouncing all his traditional roles in the process. He’s a bit naive and trusting until his wife burns him.

Judging Functional Axis:

Extroverted Thinking (Te) / Introverted Feeling (Fi)

He’s a natural leader and planner, often the one others look to for guidance. His decisions have logic motivating them, he takes his responsibilities seriously, he warns D’Artangan to “separate from his emotions” because they compromise his fighting skills. Athos can be frank and assertive, sometimes even cold when he tells others that their problems aren’t his concern. He doesn’t spare feelings whenever he has something to say. He’s often so wrapped up in his own angst-ridden problems, he forgets to make sure others are all right – such as his intended sister in law, after she loses everything. Athos never talks about how he feels about his wife’s betrayal, deception, seduction of others, or survival as the king’s mistress. He confronts her about it, but it remains a private pain, driving most of his actions.

Enneagram: 1w9 self-preservation

Athos is the most rational and level-headed of his companions, the most likely to internalize things deeply and suppress all of his emotions until they burst into a torrent of feeling – such as when he sees his wife in the courtroom and denounces her as a liar and a manipulator. He beats himself up about putting her to death when he believes her dead, but did it out of duty, principle, and “right and wrong” – she murdered his brother, she broke the law, he could not make an exception even for the woman he loves. He does not engage in the antics of his companions and sometimes tells them off, both for the danger of their decisions but also the morals involved (his disgust when Aramis seduces the queen, warning him that it could get them all killed). His 9 wing makes him want to numb himself to the pain he feels, so he over-indulges in drinking and refuses to talk about his past.