Enneagram 1 + MBTI

The perfectionism of the 1 has an obsession with “improving things” which makes their lives and those of others worse, in that it demands all experiences, attitudes, and events match up to a pre-established code of values, standards, tastes, rules, and so on. This gives them a character of “angry virtue” – one of general resentment at their own exacting standards. They are proud and hateful of subjectivity, assuming they must measure everything by their own standard. Read the full profile.

Influences on MBTI Types:

Editor’s Note: Because of its emphasis on perfection, repression of sexual and other impulses, and rigid moral standards, certain types are less likely to be 1s (I have left them off). Sometimes 9w1 NFPs mistype as 1.

ISTJ: efficient, detailed, and organized, with high personal standards of behavior and work performance for themselves; may take on and do others’ tasks instead of asking them to do them over and/or take on too much at work, school, etc, because it “takes less time for me to do it.”

ESTJ: efficient, detailed, organized, with high professional standards for oneself and others, often strives to model oneself on being the “perfect” (partner, parent, employer, employee, etc) based in external stereotypes rather than building strong emotional connections. Becomes petulant under stress (“No one ever does any work around here except me!”).

ISFJ: efficient, detailed, and has strong moral judgments about the attitudes, behaviors, and performance of others; struggles mightily both with their inner critic and habitual fear of what others may say about their output (Fe), which could cause them to delay starting things indefinitely.

ESFJ: efficient, detailed, and has strong moral ideas of how others should behave and what is socially appropriate; often has unrealistic standards for others and may not realize their own self-standards are equally impossible (due to inferior Ti / lack of self-analyzing), but can usually find ‘pleasing’ ways to ‘correct’ others and shift them toward betterment, without realizing their anger isn’t as hidden from others as they think.

INTJ: strong work ethic and high personal standards, which combine with a Ni-dom desire for a total perfect vision and inferior Se anxieties about not achieving that level of perfection in the real world when executed (which leads to procrastination and fear of beginning, because if they can’t have their perfect vision, they won’t take anything!). May tend to over-simplify complex morality into rigid black and white guidelines.

ENTJ: efficient and organized, with a strong and sometimes unrealistic “perfect” vision it wants to attain in the real world through work / school, etc., more than willing to take decisive action to make it happen, but may blame others if perfection isn’t attained (due to low Fi / 1’s tendency to refuse to take responsibility when things go wrong). Prone to strong views of morality, and may push away from tert-Se desires for pleasure, and new experiences, etc., which may leave the ENTJ feeling imbalanced, angry that their morals prevent them from having fun, or envious of freer spirits.

INFJ: strong personal standards, often unrealistic in their desire for “perfection,” prone to idealized visions but abstract horror at the idea they may not be attainable in real life (inferior Se problems), which could mean they never start, leading to feelings of self-disappointment and criticism for being “lazy” (which is evil!); strong moral opinions on how others should behave, often tied to a Ni-sense of “who they COULD” be. Often, total neglect of inferior Se / looking down on people who “over-indulge.”

ENFJ: a sense of who people could be, as a more perfect version of themselves, prone to trying to push them toward it; strong moral ideas of how others should behave and what is socially appropriate; often has unrealistic standards for others and may not realize their own self-standards are equally impossible (due to inferior Ti / lack of self-analyzing). Struggles to reconcile tert-Se desires (food, sex, experiences, etc) as not being “bad” or “shameful,” and may neglect Se-development, while secretly being envious and resentful of people who “live a little.” Also prone to anxiety about not realizing their “perfect” vision in real life, but more often focused on an idealized, unattainable “perfect vision of oneself.”

ISFP: super strong moral judgments which dictate all their decisions; their desire to be hard-working and efficient will tax their inferior Te, making them prone to self-berating for lack of organizational skill or efficiency; they want to ‘control’ their Se impulses and may feel dissatisfied as a result.

ENFP: prone to unrealistic, ever-changing standards of perfection that are vague (but all amount to “not what you currently are”), strives for perfection in all their relationships and creative projects; is meticulous when it comes to work and triple-checks everything (low Si problems), then feels much more guilt than necessary over “honest mistakes” (due to anxiety about how the other person must feel about them now). Strong moral views of behavior which makes them frown at others who seem irresponsible, immoral, or do not get their work done on time.

INFP: super strong moral judgments which dictate all their decisions; their desire to be hard-working and efficient will tax their inferior Te, making them prone to self-berating for lack of organizational skill or efficiency; prone to unrealistic personal standards of perfection which are vague, and reverts to negative self-comparison to stereotypes (Si), more meticulous due to low Si and harder on themselves than on anyone else.